Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category

Making Brown Turkey Stock in Advance ~ Recipe Revisited

I first discovered the idea of making turkey stock in advance of a major holiday six years ago and blogged about it here. Since then, I’ve learned much more about developing flavor and simplifying the procedure, so I’m revising and re-posting the recipe. You can go ahead and make your gravy in advance, too, if you want, or make it while the turkey is resting. But having this great stock already on hand will simplify things on the big day, as well as make your food more delicious.

Adding herbs to stockI learned from this experience that a great stock is absolutely key to a great turkey gravy, turkey soup, turkey stuffing – whatever turkey recipe your heart desires. Oh. My. God, it’s amazing. And it’s easier than you might think. It’s time-consuming, but mostly hands-off, so it really is a cinch to make.

There are two kinds of stock you can choose to make: white stock, where the bones, vegetables, etc., are simmered in water but not browned first, and brown stock, where you roast the bones and vegetables before simmering them. Which to choose is a matter of taste and what you want to achieve with the end result. I prefer the roasty toasty caramelized flavors of the brown stock, so this is the recipe I use. You can also follow this recipe to make stock from the turkey carcass after the big meal, and from the carcass of a roasted chicken as well.

One of the most important ingredients in a great brown stock is the fond, or browned bits, that gets stuck to the bottom of a roasting pan. These are full of flavor from the Maillard reaction – proteins and sugars in meats and vegetables caramelize with the oven’s heat and create thousands of savory flavor compounds. You want to scrape all this up and include it in your stock. It’s very, very important that you do not let this go down the drain. Plus, using it in your stock makes the pan easier to clean! Win, win!

Make-Ahead Brown Turkey Stock

Makes about 3 quarts

Don’t add salt or pepper until you are ready to use the stock. If you add it in the beginning, as the stock simmers and reduces, it can become unpalatably salty.

1/4 cup vegetable oil
3 pounds turkey bones, wings or necks
2 carrots, coarsely chopped
2 ribs celery, coarsely chopped
2 onions, coarsely chopped
1 head garlic, halved crosswise
2 cups dry white wine
1 gallon cold water
12 sprigs fresh thyme
12 stems fresh parsley (reserve leaves for another recipe)
3 bay leaves

Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees. Drizzle oil around roasting pan. Place turkey parts, carrots, celery, onions, and garlic in roasting pan and toss well to coat with oil. Roast, stirring occasionally, until well browned, 1 to 1-1/2 hours.

Transfer contents of roasting pan to stock pot or Dutch oven. Place the roasting pan over two burners on medium-high heat. Add the wine to the roasting pan and use a wooden spatula to stir and scrape up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Watch as the liquid turns a deep brown with savory goodness. Add the liquid and all the browned bits to the stock pot.

Add remaining broth and herbs to the pot and bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer, just so small bubbles break the surface, for about four hours.

Use tongs and a spider or slotted spoon to remove large pieces from the pot. Pour stock through a fine-mesh strainer into another pot (at least 3 quarts), cover with a lid, and refrigerate until fat congeals, at least 2 hours. Discard solids.

Using soup spoon, skim fat and reserve. You can use this to make your gravy now and freeze it, or reserve for another use.

Raw ingredients

Roasted ingredients

Adding herbs

Finished stock

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Thai Red Curry with Shrimp

So, after a bit of a hiatus, I’m back to blogging! I posted a pic of this dish on Facebook, some people asked about it, so here’s the recipe.

Dan and I both love bell peppers. I especially like the beautiful rainbow of colors available, so we buy a “stoplight” package – one each of red, orange and yellow peppers – plus at least one green pepper, almost every week. In the summer, we grow our own. That saves a lot of money! Can’t wait to get the garden going.

I also grow Thai basil in my herb garden. If you have some, use that; otherwise, regular Italian basil is a good substitute.

Thai Red Curry with Shrimp

Thai Red Curry with Shrimp

2 tbsp. peanut oil
1 medium onion, peeled, halved and sliced
2 cups bell peppers, any colors, seeded, halved crosswise and sliced (I used 1/2 each of red, yellow and orange peppers)
1 stalk celery, sliced 1/4-inch thick
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tbsp. Thai red curry paste (I use Thai Kitchen brand)
2 tbsp. fish sauce
2 tsp. palm sugar or light brown sugar
1 14-oz. can light coconut milk
1/3 cup raisins
1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
3 tbsp. Thai basil leaves, coarsely chopped (optional)
3 tbsp. cilantro, chopped
3 cups jasmine rice, cooked, for serving
Sriracha hot sauce, optional, for serving

In a large sauté pan, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and sauté a few minutes to soften. Add bell peppers, celery and garlic and stir a few more minutes. Add curry paste and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in fish sauce and sugar, then coconut milk and raisins. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer till slightly thickened, about 2 minutes.

Stir shrimp into curry and simmer till just cooked, about 2 minutes.

Remove pan from the heat and stir in basil, if using, and cilantro.

Serve over jasmine rice. Sprinkle with sriracha, if desired, and garnish with cilantro sprigs.

Makes 4 servings.

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Need a calendar for 2013?

If you haven’t received a calendar for 2013, check this out! Twelve pages of yummy recipes and pretty pictures of food. Happy New Year!

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Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce

I am a vinegar fiend. I just checked my cupboard and I have 11 different kinds of vinegar. So when I came across this recipe for chimichurri sauce in Cooks’ Illustrated magazine a few years ago, I really wanted to try it. It’s kind of like a kicked-up version of Italian dressing with a larger proportion of vinegar and uses red-wine vinegar – my favorite.

Chimichurri sauce is a condiment from Argentina generally used as a steak sauce, but it can be used on all kinds of grilled meats. There are variations that include cilantro or oregano, but I found I didn’t like those flavors as well, so I just use parsley. I also am not fond of the bite of fresh onion and garlic, so I reduced the amount of garlic and soaked it and the onion in the vinegar to remove some of their pungency.

Even though summer is unofficially over, there are lots of good grilling days ahead, so try this with your next cookout.

Chimichurri Sauce for Grilled Steak
Adapted from Cooks Illustrated

1 cup parsley leaves (reserve stems for another use)
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 cup finely minced red onion
1/4 cup red-wine vinegar
3 medium cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
2 tbsp. water
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes

Add red onion and garlic to red-wine vinegar and let sit for 10 minutes. Place all ingredients in a food processor or blender and process until fairly smooth. Taste and add salt, if needed. Will keep refrigerated for one week.

Steak with chimichurri sauce

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How to grow tomatoes + 115 ways to prepare them

Home-grown tomatoesSomeone posted this to a cooking site I like to visit. It’s a free e-book with two chapters – Chapter One is a biographical sketch of George Washington Carver, the famous African-American scientist, botanist, educator, and inventor and Chapter 2 is his book “How to Grow the Tomato and 115 Ways to Prepare it for the Table.”

You can download it here: “How to Grow the Tomato and 115 Ways to Prepare it for the Table” (PDF) by George Washington Carver.

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Food-writing class: Recipe writing

For the food-writing class I’m taking at the Muse, we have an assignment to take a badly written recipe and rewrite it in proper format with good directions. Patrick gave us several to choose from and we practiced in class.

This selection sounds like it would make a good casserole for a potluck, and since this is the season … enjoy.

Garden veggies from our 2008 garden
From our 2008 garden: ingredients that could be used in this dish

Black Bean Tortilla Casserole

A meatless meal with lots of zip. Good for vegetarians and those on a budget.

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped
2 green bell peppers, chopped
4 ounces jalapenos, minced
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained (or, if in season, 2 large tomatoes, chopped)
3/4 cup salsa
2 15-ounce cans black kidney beans
12 6-inch corn tortillas
2 cups Monterey Jack cheese, shredded (divided use)

2 medium tomatoes, sliced
2 cups lettuce, shredded
3 green onions, sliced
1/8 cup black olives, sliced
1/2 cup sour cream, optional

Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a large skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add onions, peppers, jalapenos, garlic and cumin. Saute for five minutes. Stir in undrained tomatoes and salsa. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Stir in beans.

Spread 1/3 of the bean mixture over the bottom of a 13”x9”x2” baking dish. Top with half of the tortillas, overlapping as necessary, and half of the cheese. Add another 1/3 of the bean mixture, the remaining tortillas, and the rest of the bean mixture. Cover with foil and bake for 30-35 minutes until heated through.

Sprinkle with remaining cheese and let stand 10 minutes. Top with tomato slices, lettuce, green onion and olives. Cut into squares and serve with sour cream.

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